Startups, Innovation, Technology and Me.

The Coolest Coworking Space We’ve Ever Seen via @wired

To attract the right mix of creatives, Jellyfish Cartel’s space focuses on art and artists. A career working in youth culture had allowed Lee to work with several now-famous artists — like a young, unknown Shepard Fairey and MacArthur “genius” grantee Jorge Pardo — and she added a few of their pieces to the space. But she also commissioned a few custom works, which she says is a smart way to engage your creative friends. “If you look around in your own peer group, you know who takes great photos, who makes cool felt hair pins,” she says. “Just celebrate the people in your own circle.”

For the back wall of the conference room, artist, photographer and curator Aaron Rose created an homage to L.A., featuring photos of the city and origami paper arranged in a grid of $3.99 plexiglas frames — an idea Lee says anyone can borrow using their own collection of images. And perhaps her proudest “acquisition” was also her most affordable: six cans of Campbell’s Tomato Soup, which she purchased for less than $5.00 and placed next to a photo of Andy Warhol.

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What started as an eight-desk shared workspace for developers called Spiral Muse has grown into 1,779 spaces in dozens of countries, with new communities being launched every day. It wasn’t necessarily Neuberg’smodel of coworking that spread around the world. Rather, in the true spirit of openness and collaboration—which are foundational principals of the movement—it was the opensource concept of working independently, yet together, that sparked a global revolt against business as usual.
For more surprising and encouraging statistics about the benefits of coworking and how it’s helping spawn a new mobile workforce full of independent, interconnected professionals, check out the infographic!

What started as an eight-desk shared workspace for developers called Spiral Muse has grown into 1,779 spaces in dozens of countries, with new communities being launched every day. It wasn’t necessarily Neuberg’smodel of coworking that spread around the world. Rather, in the true spirit of openness and collaboration—which are foundational principals of the movement—it was the opensource concept of working independently, yet together, that sparked a global revolt against business as usual.

For more surprising and encouraging statistics about the benefits of coworking and how it’s helping spawn a new mobile workforce full of independent, interconnected professionals, check out the infographic!

The 6 People You Need in Your Corner

Nothing incredible is accomplished alone. You need others to help you, and you need to help others. With the right team, you can form a web of connections to make the seemingly impossible practically inevitable.

The Instigator:

Someone who pushes you, who makes you think. Who motivates you to get up and go, and try, and make things happen. You want to keep this person energized, and enthusiastic. This is the voice of inspiration.

See The Other 5 Here 

A Free Beginner’s Guide to the Sharing Economy

                               

For over two years, Shareable has explored the new sharing economy in its many forms: how individuals, families, communities, entrepreneurs, businesses, designers, coders, and countless more are building resilience through collaboration and sharing. In that time, they’ve amassed a considerable library of how-to share guides, and researched and documented how these shifts are transforming the economy, technology, and civil society.

Still, those new to the sharing lifestyle may wonder where to start. As demonstrated in the free New Dream Community Action Kit Guide to Sharingproduced by The Center for a New American Dream in collaboration with Shareable, sharing isn’t something we need to relearn. It’s a childhood skill we’ve never lost, like riding a bike.

Read the entire post and download the guide, it’s worth it.


In New Office Designs, Room to Roam and to Think

The 21st-century workplace extols open space, not hierarchy. At the Seattle base of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, hallway extensions offer places for informal meetings or private thought.

he building was designed by NBBJ, a 700-employee architecture firm whose largest operation is in Seattle. The structure is a culmination of ideas about the 21st-century workplace that NBBJ has been exploring in corporate office designs worldwide, including its own offices here.

These are the main concepts: Buzz — conversational noise and commotion — is good. Private offices and expressions of hierarchy are of debatable value. Less space per worker may be inevitable for cost-effectiveness, but it can enhance the working environment, not degrade it. Daylight, lots of it, is indispensable. Chance encounters yield creative energy. And mobility is essential.

This isn’t a suddenly exploding trend. NBBJ’s research has found that two-thirds of American office space is now configured in some sort of open arrangement. But even as these designs save employers space and money, they can make office workers feel like so many cattle. So how to humanize the setting?

SEATTLE serves as a test tube because of several converging factors: There’s a lot of money here to experiment with projects. The work force is relatively young and open to innovation. And the local culture places a high value on informality, autonomy and egalitarianism. People will put in long hours under high pressure if they feel respected, but they won’t tolerate being treated like Dilberts.

Continue Reading via The New York Times.


Interesting Design Concept - The Blackberry “smart” wrap around screen.

From Yanko Design

Very rarely do designers venture into the BlackBerry turf. I think the perception of it being a serious business phone deters concept enthusiasts. For the moment we have this refreshing concept, which capitalizes on the new screen technology that is flexible, lightweight and transparent. Iterated as candy bar and a slider, the phones feature a “smart” wrap around screen and knows the difference between an intentional command and a hand holding the phone!

John explains, “The front and back cameras are positioned underneath the screens. When needed the area around the camera lens becomes transparent. The wrap around screen can allow for separate workspaces and/or a more three-dimensional interaction with the device. Obvious benefits apply to business, entertainment and navigation applications.”

Designer: John Anastasiadis

Freelancers, Alone No More: #Coworking Is Going Big Business

Coworking spaces were initially conceived to give independent workers an alternative to the coffee shop, providing reliable Internet connections, printers, meeting space and other office amenities. Today, there’s growing interest in coworking spaces from larger companies as an alternative to the cube farm, as a way to lower real estate overhead, boost sustainability and stimulate workers who thrive on the spaces’ entrepreneurial energy.

Last week CoCo and five other U.S. coworking spaces announced they’ve formed the League of Extraordinary Coworking Spaces (LEXC), which means they will honor each other’s memberships and let users reserve spaces online. The move is aimed in part at making it easier and more appealing for larger companies to get into the game.

The concept has existed informally in coworking culture from the beginning. If you’re traveling and drop by another city’s coworking hub, they’re likely to welcome you for the day. LEXC is an attempt to make that process more simple and transparent, while also adding a layer of formality expected by many larger companies.

"I think the potential there is extraordinarily large," says Mark Gilbreath, founder and CEO of LiquidSpace, whose technology serves as the online reservation platform for LEXC. “There’s a seismic shift underway in large companies with respect to how they are envisioning their own internal real estate. That shift is toward mobility.”

That new thinking is being driven by everything from real estate uncertainty to sustainability goals—shared workspaces often mean smaller environmental footprints. But above all it’s being viewed as a recruiting and retention strategy.

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"Play is nature’s learning engine" (VIDEO) - Collaboration success depends on fun.

(Source: collaborationking.com)